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Communications Resources

Informative Speeches

An informative speech gives unbiased, factual information on a topic, person, event, or concept. The goal is to educate the audience without an opinion, judgment, or intent to change the audience's attitude. The informative speech should enlighten listeners on a subject that is non-controversial. Some types of informative speeches include:

  • Demonstrating to an audience how to do something such as changing a tire, or attaching a file to an email.

  • Describing a particular activity, object, person, or place. Examples would be a piece of artwork, the Great Wall of China, or First Lady Melania Trump.

  • Concept speeches focus on a belief, idea, or theory. Examples include:  Christianity, the Big Bang Theory, or non-violent protesting.

     

Persuasive Speeches

A persuasive speech proposes to change a person's beliefs or actions on a particular issue. The presenter takes a side and gives his/her opinion on why something is good/bad, right/wrong, moral/immoral, or justified/unjustified. The topics tend to be debatable and the speech itself should have a convincing tone. While the objective is to sway your audience, it is important to have factual evidence to support your argument. Common examples of persuasive public speaking include:

  • A politician running for office or re-election
  • A lawyer or prosecutor trying to influence a jury
  • A doctor persuading a patient to stop smoking
  • A salesclerk encouraging a customer to open a credit card

Ceremonial Speeches

Ceremonial speeches often fall into the following categories:

  • Award presentation or acceptance of an award or tribute
  • Introduction of a speaker, guest, prominent individual
  • Commencement address
  • Memorial or eulogy address
  • Public Prayer
  • Roast or Toast